Posted in Arts, Top Arts

Views will be remembered as one of Drake’s best albums

The album highlights Drake’s ability to not be stuck in one genre

After two years of speculation and two mixtapes Views finally has dropped.
After two years of speculation and two mixtapes Views finally has dropped.
Image Credits: OVO Sound

Views (formerly Views from the 6) has been the subject of much speculation ever since Drake announced the project way back in 2014. Since then, Drake’s dropped the successful album/mixtape If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late, as well as Future collaboration What a Time to Be Alive, both of which have helped transition Drake’s sound into more trap territory, shifting away from earlier, more atmospheric songs such as “Marvin’s Room.” Read below for our track-by-track review.

“Keep the Family Close” – A surprisingly orchestral track, a sharp contrast from his two previous efforts. Drake sings about the usual feeling of betrayal and heartbreak. Something different from his previous songs, but I like it.

“9” – A great track that combines a hard-hitting trap beat with a synth backing that feels like it’s hovering above the whole thing. “I turned the 6 upside down / It’s a nine now” is a great line.

“U With Me?” – Gives off a great late-night vibe. As Drake says on the song “I made a career off of reminiscing,” and this song is no different, with Drake thinking back to one of his many past relationships.

“Feel No Ways” – Sounds like something straight off a mid-’80s pop song. Sounds very similar to “Find Your Love,” arguably Drake’s best song off his first studio album. And it all ties in well with the lyrical theme of changing feelings and moving on. Great track.

“Hype” – A return to recent Drake songs that listeners may be familiar with. A very basic beat with Drake hyping himself up with lines such as “Views already a classic.”

“Weston Road Flows” – Named after a major road out in the 6, on this track Drake reminisces about the life he had before he blew up and became the cultural phenomenon he is today, as well as some shots against the competition. “I’m lookin’ at their first-week numbers / like what are thoooooose” is probably the best line on the whole album. He even managed to get a line in about Kevin Durant. Perhaps a tampering charge is coming to the Raptors?

“Redemption” – A very laid-back track, in which he sings about an ex-girl and wonders what to say to her. Harkens way back to his So Far Gone days, a very simple beat and heartfelt singing and lyrics. The last verse is especially poignant, talking about how his friends and family have changed since he got famous.

“With You” – An absolute banger. PartyNextDoor nails the hook, and Drake’s verse is great. Very similar in structure to “Come and See Me,” given both songs boast a single verse, but this track is way more upbeat and fun.

“Faithful” – A track that was leaked a few weeks ago. It’s a throwback to the emotional and sensitive tracks from Take Care. Drake discusses his feelings for a girl, but laments that she is too busy working. The first verse is one from the late Pimp C, taken from the Tom Ford remix. Also features a verse from one of my favourite new artists right now, dvsn, who are signed to Drake’s OVO label.

“Still Here” – A song to separate the real from the fake. Drake talks about how he started from the bottom, and thus can spot the outsiders from a mile away. Production-wise, sounds very similar to Future, from the beat to the slightly auto-tuned singing throughout the song.

“Controlla” – Gives off a similar vibe to his remix of “Sweeterman.” A very mellow track that you can just zone out to, with a catchy hook and a great beat.

“One Dance” – Described by Rap Genius as a “afrobeat song with dancehall inflections” it’s a super-catchy song with a great beat that drives the song. This song has also been around for a few weeks now as well, but it’s still a great track.

“Grammy” – I have to say, Future’s verse on this track is very underwhelming. It’s very repetitive, and I know that’s his style, but it just does not suit the song.

“Child’s Play” – Drake raps about how buying girls items is nothing to him now, thus it’s child’s play. A fun track, but is overshadowed by other great tracks on the album.

“Pop Style” – The album version notably does not feature the verse from the throne, aka Kanye West and Jay-Z. But it’s still a great track. The lyrics deal with Drake’s ever-increasing trust issues, and the beat sounds very ominous. A great track.

“Too Good” – Drake and Rihanna team up once again on this song. The song is about a couple who think they’re both too good for each other, and it continues the Jamaican/African dancehall vibe that is prevalent on some of the other songs.

“Summers Over Interlude” – A complete 180 from the other songs, as it resembles a slow rock song more than anything else. Just a standard interlude that really didn’t need to be on the album, and it’s weird that he included it on it in the first place.

“Fire & Desire” – Drake displays his dedication to one woman in this song. Problem is, she’s already taken. Possibly a song about Nicki Minaj, given his comments about her to Zane Lowe on OVO Sound Radio the day that Views was released. 

“Views” – Arguably my favourite track on the entire album. Drake drops line after fantastic line on a great beat very reminiscent to “Lord Knows” off Take Care. Lyrically the song is similar to “6PM in New York, in that Drake talks about where he came from and where he’s headed.

“Hotline Bling” – The same “Hotline Bling” we’ve been listening to for almost a year. I would have liked to see a remix of the song, or the version from the popular music video where it gets right back into the beat instead of fading out. Still a great track, but I think “Views” would have been better as a closing track.

Overall: A grander album, very different from If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late. The songs flow together and more to the production, compared to the stripped-down songs on IYRTITL. You can’t really pin down a musical theme for this one; there’s just so many different ones from Jamaican afrobeat to trap to more traditional hip hop. If you don’t like it the first listen, give it a couple of more tries; it will probably grow on you. I think in a few years we’ll be looking at this one as one of Drake’s best.

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