Posted in Arts, Top Arts

Toronto’s Harrison is a new kind of DJ

Despite dealing with performance anxiety, Harrison is a force to be reckoned with

You don't have to scream to be heard, is the embodiment of Harrison's sound.
You don't have to scream to be heard, is the embodiment of Harrison's sound.
Image Credits: Phillip Skoczkowski

For those who prefer a more chill form of club music, Harrison, a DJ from Toronto, came to Vancouver to fulfil your most laid-back dreams. On his Secret Songs Canadian Tour with Ryan Hemsworth and Ryan Playground, Harrison graced Fortune Sound Club on May 6 with his electronic vibes.

Describing his sound as “electronic uplifting melancholy music,” this Canadian sensation has over 30,000 followers on SoundCloud. He has a unique sound, proving that even in today’s crazy world you don’t have to scream to be heard.

“It took a while to figure out how I wanted my own music to sound. . . I’m just really happy with the way it sounds now,” Harrison told The Peak. This happiness is evident in his music, which reverberates with good vibes.

Growing up on the Eastside of Toronto was a pleasure, according to Harrison. “It’s very nice and quiet. . . I’m not very good with dealing with downtown, hectic situations,” he said. “I don’t even like playing music live because it’s just too much sometimes. . . but I’ve gotten over that over time.”

Before starting the tour, Harrison revealed that having “never been to Calgary or Vancouver. . .  [it] makes me nervous for these two small shows.” He said that his nerves stem from an “ultimate fear of being booed. . . I don’t know how Ryan Hemsworth’s fan base will react to me.”

Despite performance anxieties, “I eventually would like to have an awesome live set,” Harrison said. “I don’t wanna be a DJ forever. . . I really want to have my own set list of songs, and go up there and play the keyboard for people.”

Harrison’s musical talents go beyond his producing: “I play the piano and the guitar, I’m trying to learn the trumpet, and I’m also trying to learn the drums.” He said the drums are a problem, because “I have a really big issue with making noise. . . drums are just so loud, and I don’t want to annoy anyone.”

Yet with music like his, it’s hard to be an annoyance. Harrison’s sound is understated, with hints of funk and soul influences. His music is not your typical big DJ beats, a fact of which Harrison is proud. Like really cool elevator music, his songs are incredibly chill and soothing.
Live, Harrison’s sound is much more upbeat, with a heavy reliance on rhythm. The audience loved it, the crowded club filled with an eager audience. The receptive room took to dancing and drinking as he took to the stage and started his set. Overall, Harrison’s travels to Vancouver could be looked at as nothing but a success, with a huge line out the door of the club, and pleased patrons taking to the dance floor.

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